Bad habits you learned at school?

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#1
These are habits that I "learned" at school, or that I noticed other people have, which I imagine they probably picked up at school as well.


  1. You don't believe you have anything of value to add to most conversations.
  2. You're a bit of a workaholic and you find it difficult to just relax without feeling a need to do something productive.
  3. You also get bored easily because you've spent so much time working that you don't even know HOW to have fun on your own anymore. You always need someone or something else to entertain you.
  4. You try harder to fit in with other people than you try to come up with new ideas on your own.
  5. You don't feel good about your own accomplishments unless someone else notices them.
  6. You'd do just about anything to avoid having to think really hard, because thinking really hard reminds you of all those horribly boring calculations you had to do in school, and you don't ever ever EVER want to do that ever again.
  7. You feel like doing things you enjoy aren't worth your time unless you're sure it can accomplish something or make you money. This is because everything you did in school was assigned a grade when you were done with it... and real life doesn't really have any grades, so there isn't any objective way to measure your success. Most people substitute money for grades, and insist on believing that the more money you make, the more successful you are.
  8. You tend to judge people by their achievements, especially the external and easily measurable ones.
  9. You're afraid to make mistakes because you want to get everything done perfectly the first time around. If you make a mistake you feel like YOU are a failure. This will probably make you reluctant to try new things.
  10. You think you're too stupid to teach yourself new things - you believe you need a teacher or a college course for that.
  11. All the times you had to ask for permission to go to the bathroom probably taught you to question whether your own natural instincts can be trusted.
  12. You've learned that it's easier to tell people what they want to hear than it is to tell them the truth.
  13. You might find yourself always wondering whether what you're thinking of doing is against some rule somewhere, or if someone in charge is going to get upset with you.
  14. You feel that the only things worth doing are things that are unpleasant, things that you wouldn't do out of your own free will normally.
What about you? Any other bad habits you have, or that you've observed in others?
Reply
#1
These are habits that I "learned" at school, or that I noticed other people have, which I imagine they probably picked up at school as well.


  1. You don't believe you have anything of value to add to most conversations.
  2. You're a bit of a workaholic and you find it difficult to just relax without feeling a need to do something productive.
  3. You also get bored easily because you've spent so much time working that you don't even know HOW to have fun on your own anymore. You always need someone or something else to entertain you.
  4. You try harder to fit in with other people than you try to come up with new ideas on your own.
  5. You don't feel good about your own accomplishments unless someone else notices them.
  6. You'd do just about anything to avoid having to think really hard, because thinking really hard reminds you of all those horribly boring calculations you had to do in school, and you don't ever ever EVER want to do that ever again.
  7. You feel like doing things you enjoy aren't worth your time unless you're sure it can accomplish something or make you money. This is because everything you did in school was assigned a grade when you were done with it... and real life doesn't really have any grades, so there isn't any objective way to measure your success. Most people substitute money for grades, and insist on believing that the more money you make, the more successful you are.
  8. You tend to judge people by their achievements, especially the external and easily measurable ones.
  9. You're afraid to make mistakes because you want to get everything done perfectly the first time around. If you make a mistake you feel like YOU are a failure. This will probably make you reluctant to try new things.
  10. You think you're too stupid to teach yourself new things - you believe you need a teacher or a college course for that.
  11. All the times you had to ask for permission to go to the bathroom probably taught you to question whether your own natural instincts can be trusted.
  12. You've learned that it's easier to tell people what they want to hear than it is to tell them the truth.
  13. You might find yourself always wondering whether what you're thinking of doing is against some rule somewhere, or if someone in charge is going to get upset with you.
  14. You feel that the only things worth doing are things that are unpleasant, things that you wouldn't do out of your own free will normally.
What about you? Any other bad habits you have, or that you've observed in others?
Reply
#2
Idk, just depressed.
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#2
Idk, just depressed.
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#3
I guess I learned that the best way to fit in time to do schoolwork is at night and now I pull frequent all-nighters just to complete schoolwork. It's really starting to take a toll on my physical and emotional health and I'm not sure what to do. I just have too much work and not enough time.
I have emotions too! I am only human of course.

Wink
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#3
I guess I learned that the best way to fit in time to do schoolwork is at night and now I pull frequent all-nighters just to complete schoolwork. It's really starting to take a toll on my physical and emotional health and I'm not sure what to do. I just have too much work and not enough time.
I have emotions too! I am only human of course.

Wink
Reply
#4
Yeah, sleep is really important. Way more important than schoolwork.
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#4
Yeah, sleep is really important. Way more important than schoolwork.
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#5
You are afraid of changes. School is very predictable, such a perfectly organized but totally artificial world for perfect predictable children. They hardly ever let you make some minor decisions, everything else is planned for you. You are made to believe that following the universal curriculum leads to success. Actually, schooling isn't about gaining knowledge, developing talents – it's all about fitting in standards. But once you enter an unknown "real world", you feel totally helpless – there is no teacher to tell you what to do, no ready instructions either. Knowledge isn't as important as life skills such as communication, logic, critical thinking, adaptability to changes. Situation with coronavirus showed that most people can't cope with unpredictable new conditions. 
By the way, Soviet education was considered the best in the world as it provided students with great knowledge. However, the 90-s showed that many highly educated people didn't handle difficult times and didn't manage to take the opportunities. A lot of them died, others ended up in poverty. So should we claim that all these horrible drawbacks of public education are justified?
Reply
#5
You are afraid of changes. School is very predictable, such a perfectly organized but totally artificial world for perfect predictable children. They hardly ever let you make some minor decisions, everything else is planned for you. You are made to believe that following the universal curriculum leads to success. Actually, schooling isn't about gaining knowledge, developing talents – it's all about fitting in standards. But once you enter an unknown "real world", you feel totally helpless – there is no teacher to tell you what to do, no ready instructions either. Knowledge isn't as important as life skills such as communication, logic, critical thinking, adaptability to changes. Situation with coronavirus showed that most people can't cope with unpredictable new conditions. 
By the way, Soviet education was considered the best in the world as it provided students with great knowledge. However, the 90-s showed that many highly educated people didn't handle difficult times and didn't manage to take the opportunities. A lot of them died, others ended up in poverty. So should we claim that all these horrible drawbacks of public education are justified?
Reply
#6
I assumed that most major advancements in life were only verbal/mental. Most schools nowadays put emphasis on pen-and-paper skills, as opposed to mind/body skills. I thought I couldn't concentrate because I was lazy, then I started eating sourdough bread and felt much better. Most teachers would never suggest this idea to me.
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#6
I assumed that most major advancements in life were only verbal/mental. Most schools nowadays put emphasis on pen-and-paper skills, as opposed to mind/body skills. I thought I couldn't concentrate because I was lazy, then I started eating sourdough bread and felt much better. Most teachers would never suggest this idea to me.
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