My challenge to teachers/students that believe in the system

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#1
Wink 
In the United States, many teachers claim that their students are not working hard enough, and pressure them to work harder.  Additionally, they often like to talk about how students in Europe and Asia are generally more dedicated than American students.

The biggest reason though might not be discipline, but quality of food.  Although schools in other countries are harder than American schools, at least the schools provide high quality food to its students.  As a result, productivity is high, and crime is low.  One example is Japan: https://www.businessinsider.com/japans-a...ram-2017-3.  Another example is France: https://qz.com/515148/a-typical-week-of-...-new-york/

Many Americans don't take quality food seriously, and as a result, believe that students that struggle "don't matter" and should vanish into the mist.  Will teachers understand that nutrition matters far more than was originally assumed, and that this is, in fact, a national crisis?  That is my challenge.

Finally, I do understand that their school systems have unique problems of their own, and that there are good teachers that support this.

Additional suggestions:

* Vegetables are tasty - When they are steamed, stir-fried, or fermented.
* Fruits are tasty - When they are cooked (like apple pie) or dried
* Stick primarily to gluten-free foods like corn, potatoes, and rice, as they are the most nutritious by default.
* Only eat wheat products that are made with sourdough or Italian semolina flour, since they are the healthiest kinds of wheat products.
* Kombucha is rich in probiotics, and has a very fizzy taste
Reply
#1
Wink 
In the United States, many teachers claim that their students are not working hard enough, and pressure them to work harder.  Additionally, they often like to talk about how students in Europe and Asia are generally more dedicated than American students.

The biggest reason though might not be discipline, but quality of food.  Although schools in other countries are harder than American schools, at least the schools provide high quality food to its students.  As a result, productivity is high, and crime is low.  One example is Japan: https://www.businessinsider.com/japans-a...ram-2017-3.  Another example is France: https://qz.com/515148/a-typical-week-of-...-new-york/

Many Americans don't take quality food seriously, and as a result, believe that students that struggle "don't matter" and should vanish into the mist.  Will teachers understand that nutrition matters far more than was originally assumed, and that this is, in fact, a national crisis?  That is my challenge.

Finally, I do understand that their school systems have unique problems of their own, and that there are good teachers that support this.

Additional suggestions:

* Vegetables are tasty - When they are steamed, stir-fried, or fermented.
* Fruits are tasty - When they are cooked (like apple pie) or dried
* Stick primarily to gluten-free foods like corn, potatoes, and rice, as they are the most nutritious by default.
* Only eat wheat products that are made with sourdough or Italian semolina flour, since they are the healthiest kinds of wheat products.
* Kombucha is rich in probiotics, and has a very fizzy taste
Reply
#2
Yeah, nutrition definitely matters. I know from experience that food in Japan is very good quality and healthy. But that's not the only reason they're productive and their crime is low... the culture is SO different there. There's a lot of pressure to conform and behave in very specific ways there, and there's very little acceptance for people who can't or won't conform.

Your food suggestions are good. Kombucha is also very easy to make.
Reply
#2
Yeah, nutrition definitely matters. I know from experience that food in Japan is very good quality and healthy. But that's not the only reason they're productive and their crime is low... the culture is SO different there. There's a lot of pressure to conform and behave in very specific ways there, and there's very little acceptance for people who can't or won't conform.

Your food suggestions are good. Kombucha is also very easy to make.
Reply
#3
(05-31-2020, 10:40 PM)SoulRiser Wrote: Yeah, nutrition definitely matters. I know from experience that food in Japan is very good quality and healthy. But that's not the only reason they're productive and their crime is low... the culture is SO different there. There's a lot of pressure to conform and behave in very specific ways there, and there's very little acceptance for people who can't or won't conform.

Your food suggestions are good. Kombucha is also very easy to make.

That is true; however, I don't like it when people say that "the U.S. system is the best, therefore we don't have to change anything".
Reply
#3
(05-31-2020, 10:40 PM)SoulRiser Wrote: Yeah, nutrition definitely matters. I know from experience that food in Japan is very good quality and healthy. But that's not the only reason they're productive and their crime is low... the culture is SO different there. There's a lot of pressure to conform and behave in very specific ways there, and there's very little acceptance for people who can't or won't conform.

Your food suggestions are good. Kombucha is also very easy to make.

That is true; however, I don't like it when people say that "the U.S. system is the best, therefore we don't have to change anything".
Reply
#4
Yeah, the US system is clearly very flawed in many ways.
Reply
#4
Yeah, the US system is clearly very flawed in many ways.
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